Director’s Corner (NEMLA Blog Post #17)

Greetings from Chicago!

Today looks and feels a lot more like you would expect of March in the upper Midwest.  Lake effect snow is spreading out over the city leaving some neighborhoods buried while others see nothing but flurries.  I left the apartment this morning in a white out and arrived to a very snowbound and icy UIC campus.  Treacherous walking between buildings.  I guess it’s true what they say about the weather.  If you don’t like it, just wait a minute.  Hopefully the weather is better wherever you are.  And if not, that you’re inside watching the storm with a warm beverage.

The NEMLA 2017 Conference is just around the corner.  We’ll be meeting this year in Baltimore, MD from March 23-26.  Here is the main page for this year’s conference with links to the full program:  https://www.buffalo.edu/nemla/convention.html. I look forward to meeting some of you there.  This year NEMLA is setting tables aside for networking with other scholars in between sessions during the day, at the Saturday evening reception, and also at the closing brunch on Sunday.  I plan to be at the table devoted to the area I represent (Anglophone/American) meeting conference attendees and presenters.  Thanks to Claire Sommers, our NEMLA promotions fellow, for arranging this new initiative.  I’d love the opportunity to hear more about the research and teaching conducting by our members and your suggestions for the Pittsburg convention in 2018.  So please stop by!

Speaking of Pittsburg, if you are already thinking ahead to next year’s convention and have a session you’d like to propose, here is a link to the session proposal page for the 2018 conference.  http://www.buffalo.edu/nemla/convention/session.html.  As a reminder, there are six types of sessions: Seminar, Panel, Roundtable, Creative Session, Workshop, and Poster Session.  Descriptions for each type of session can be found here: https://www.buffalo.edu/nemla/convention/session/sessions.html.

I’ve had questions from potential session proposers about the difference between a Panel and a Roundtable.  Panels are good if you have a piece of writing that is not quite ready for publication review and is still in need of conceptual revisions.  Roundtables are good if you have concepts you want to discuss with an audience and are not anticipating publishing the records of that discussion.  If your paper is generally ready for publication but still needs some feedback, you might consider a Seminar rather than a Panel.  Seminars involve circulating papers ahead of time among session presenters and generally provide greater depth of commentary.

I don’t have a lot to say this month.  My workload has been pretty heavy as we pass the midterm mark on campus.  There is plenty of grading to do in my First Year Writing courses as well as my Survey of American Literature.  This has made any sustained thought  pretty difficult.  I seem to keep swimming from task to task, much like my students.  I couldn’t help but think of this when I read Department of Education Secretary Betsey DeVos’s comments on faculty telling students what to say and what to think.  That made me laugh.  (https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2017/02/24/education-secretary-criticizes-professors-telling-students-what-think)  If I could tell my students what’s on my mind right now, it would be that I need a long vacation and a lifetime ban on emails and committee meetings.  I’ve already spent about two hours today answering emails, mostly from students who missed class today due to the weather.  Not much propagandizing going on here.  Just good old logistics.  I’ll have to work on building up my elitist, liberal, professor agenda.  : )

Speaking of agendas, I’ve decided to tweet my work week for the rest of the semester so the world can see what an NTT professor of English such as myself does with his time on the job.  You can follow my posts on Twitter at #facultylife.  Feel free to post your own updates on the work you do at that hashtag.  Let the world know that what we do is real work, most of it supremely unglamorous.

In my next post, I’ll be sharing some highlights from this year’s NEMLA convention in Baltimore.

Until next time…

John Casey

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